Security and Technology

Belka’s First Law of Security - For every new technology introduced to solve a problem, that technology introduces an opposite and equal set of new problems.

 

Changes in society have often been the by product of changes and advances in technology.  Libraries are replete with books chronicling the history of one branch of technology and how it influenced the world around it.  Advances in agriculture, sanitation, metal working, military science, medicine, printing, and information technology, to name a few, all have left indelible stamps on human history.  Disruptive technologies change the status quo, creating opportunity and opposition in their wake.  No where in recent experience is this more true than information technology and the Internet.

The changes the Internet and information technology has presented society with many challenges.  Where does society draw the boundaries between information and privacy?  How much anonymity on the Internet is needed and when do we need positive identity? All the information in the world is at our finger tips, but how much is too much?  Is there a too much?  When implementing new technologies, it is important to think through the impacts, results, and side effects of that technology.  It is the anticipation of cause and effect of disruptive technology that can reduce or mitigate the opposite and equal set of new problems a new technology introduces.  This should take place in development, in the engineering phase, and not after the problems are exposed after implementation.

BELKA’S SECOND LAW OF SECURITY

Security is an enabling technology. 

When E-Commerce sites first came on-line, there was a reticence about using credit cards.  Security technology has made that safer.  Cyber criminals now work to steal credit cards through computer break-ins and social engineering (phishing).  Security technology is making that harder.  Technology for the protection of data renders the results of a break in moot.  Information security is a means to mitigate the "opposite and equal" set of security problems brought about by new technology.  Security at the development and engineering phase makes that set of new problems smaller or nil by careful design.